Sunday, January 17, 2010

Nook eBook Reader

I recently purchased a Nook, Barnes and Noble's eBook reader. I looked at Amazon's Kindle and Sony's Reader before making my decision. I was able to preview the Sony Reader at Best Buy; I read LOTS of reviews for Amazon's Kindle and the decision came down to:
- I didn't like the buttons on the face of the Kindle.
- The Kindle reportedly uses/used Sprint's wireless network (more about that later)
- I just didn't like the look and feel of the Sony Reader

The Nook measures 4.9 inches by 7.7 inches, slightly larger than your average paperback, but much thinner--only a half-inch thick! Navigation is via color touchscreen at the bottom of the device. From there, you can view your library of downloaded eBooks, as well as purchase eBooks from B&N.

To purchase books, you can search/browse B&N's entire catalog of eBooks for FREE via AT&Ts 3G wireless network (yep, I said FREE). Just select your book and it's immediately downloaded directly to the Nook. No connecting to your PC required. (The Kindle uses the Sprint network which I have for my cell phone and I HATE it. One of the main reasons I went with the Nook.)

The reading display utilizes E ink® Vizplex™ technology which makes reading outdoors just as easy as indoors. (Note: the display is not backlight--it's not necessary. Backlighting would also drain battery power.) You can make the font bigger or smaller, and change the font face --there are two serifed faces and one sans serif face to choose from. I prefer the sans serif Helvetica font. (Serifs are those little "spurs" at the top and/or bottom of the letters...and no, I didn't have to look that up. I'm a font geek--goes back to my commercial art days in college.)

The Nook boasts it can store up to 1300 books...even more with its MicroSD slot (not available on the Kindle). New releases typically run $9.99 with earlier releases around $5.99.

The Nook also has a built-in audio player (MP3) which works fairly well. I don't care for the way it creates playlists, but I didn't buy it for the audio, so it's really no big deal.

B&N states the Nook's battery lasts 10 hours if you don't keep the wireless feature turned on. I haven't seen that kind of battery life and apparently, neither have a multitude of other Nook owners. That's really the only beef I have with the device. So far, I've been recharging about every third day. I can live with it, but I'm hoping future software upgrades will remedy the battery situation.

Overall, I love it. I've already read David Baldacci's "True Blue" and I'm currently working my way through Francis Chan's "Crazy Love" and "Super Freakonomics" by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner. What I like most is the fact that I can carry several books with me wherever I go. No more running out of stuff to read.

More Nook info here: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/nook/index.asp?cds2Pid=30195

10 comments:

Jim W said...

Don't know anything about the various electronic books, but I found it interesting that you're reading Francis Chan's "Crazy Love". How are you doing with that book?
My church men's group has been reading it for the last several weeks. I find myself torn by it. On the one hand, we should be loving God as this book describes; on the other hand, I find myself wondering how we can sustain that kind of love. Intellectually, I can rationalize that through the power of the Holy Spirit, we can do it. But...I wonder if God intends us to be a bonfire (as this book seems to indicate) or if maybe a low smoldering fire is more His plan? I think you're knowledgeable enough of fires that you understand that bonfires have uses, but a low fire is more usable (not to mention, more pleasant to be around).
If you haven't read Chap 9 yet, I won't spoil it for you, but Chap 9 spoiled the rest of the book for me. That chapter basically threw out everything written earlier and has me questioning the previous intent and direction of those chapters. Not that the whole chapter is bad, but there are some very questionable items. Really unhappy about it.
Anyway, hope you enjoy the books and get good info out of them.
Hope we can do some communicating about this book. Take care.

Keith said...

Jim: I'm working my way through three different books (three different genres) right now, so I'm not moving through the Chan book as quickly as I probably could. I picked it up because I had seen several people comment on it. Honestly , I don't know much about the guy, other than most of the younger pastors I encounter seem to have a thing for him.

I don't find the book to be all that deep, but I have yet to encounter something with which I don't agree. Chan's writing style makes for an easy read so far.

I'm with you re: maintaining a level of loving God that is promoted by the book. I did find Chan's confession--paraphrasing here--that he sometimes struggles with his own relationship a bit encouraging, i.e. I'm not the only one in that boat. I feel guilty for not reading my Bible like I should, or praying more often or witnessing to others. Just meditating on God, His awesome creation, etc. escapes my notice many days because I get so caught up in the day-to-day of work and family. Who knows, maybe this will be the shot in the arm I'm looking for.

I'll let you know more of my thoughts after I get past Chapter Nine.

Thanks for stopping by.

Jim W said...

Thanks for the reply, Keith. Like you, I didn't find it very deep, and like you, I didn't really find anything to disagree with him. On one level, it is an absolutely true book and one that all Christians should read. On another level, it sets up an impossible standard (which, of course, loving God with everything we have is impossible unless we rely on God Himself to provide that love). I think that's what bothers me about this book. There doesn't seem to be any recognition of our fallen humanness and because of that we cannot love God with all our being, but this book seems to be telling us that we can do just that, and the best way to do it is by giving more and if we gave everything we owned, we'd really be pleasing God.
Anyway, it does present some interesting ideas and I most certainly believe every pastor who preaches a "health-and-wealth" gospel should read it. Even those who don't preach that, but preach on "being blessed" now, should read it. Like I said, nothing really wrong until Chap 9, then it held up a certain person as an example that made me want to throw up, and pretty much made me reconsider the rest of the book.
Take it easy, hope to "talk" to you later.
PS Are you on FaceBook, per chance?

Keith said...

Jim: My FB page is http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=30559401&id=1162323137#/keithwhitfield?ref=search&sid=506815273.3431071384..1

How about you?

Jim W said...

Thanks for the Facebook info. I sent you a friend request, if you don't mind.

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Lonnie said...

unrelated to blog!!!

Hey, I've moved to Southern California. Wife got a job and I followed.

Are you comin to McArthur conference this year?

Please e-mail yo e-mail address

Lonnie Lee Busby

Lonnie said...

unrelated to blog!!!

Hey, I've moved to Southern California. Wife got a job and I followed.

Are you comin to McArthur conference this year?

Please e-mail yo e-mail address

Lonnie Lee Busby

Keith said...

We're heading the opposite direction this year. Going to Together for the Gospel in Louisville, KY. MacArthur, Dever, Mohler, Piper, Mahaney speaking -- among others.

keithwhitfield[at]cox[dot]net

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